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What does «clean code» mean in 2020?

JUG Ru Group corporate blog IT systems testing *JavaScript *Perfect code *.NET *

«Clean Code» and a clean cat

There is nothing developers enjoy better than arguing about clean code: Dan Abramov, for example, has recently fueled the hype with his blog post, «Goodbye, Clean Code».

However, “clean code” per se doesn’t even have a clear definition. The main book on the subject is Clean Code, where Robert «Uncle Bob» Martin states that there are perhaps as many definitions as there are programmers. But he doesn’t walk away from the fact with a conclusion that there’s no reason to discuss clean code, rather — compare several definitions and highlight general ideas. Therefore he cites the views of several outstanding programmers on what clean code is.

So we have also become interested in what people in 2020 think of clean code. Have the views changed since the publication of the book? Do opinions vary in different IT fields (maybe backend developers perceive the idea of clean code differently from testers)?

This spring, Uncle Bob comes to St. Petersburg to give talks at our three conferences: they are about .NET development, testing and JavaScript. Therefore, we’ve asked speakers from each of those conferences to share their opinion on clean code so we could compare the opinions of the industry experts in 2020.

We've already published the results in Russian, and here's the English version. Since the topic is known to provoke discussions, feel free to give your own definition or argue about those already given!

UPD: When we posted this article, Uncle Bob had our conferences in his schedule. Unfortunately, the situation has changed. We updated this post on March 12, to avoid any misunderstanding.

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Total votes 10: ↑10 and ↓0 +10
Views 5.2K
Comments 0

The big interview with Martin Kleppmann: “Figuring out the future of distributed data systems”

JUG Ru Group corporate blog Programming *Conferences Distributed systems *Interview


Dr. Martin Kleppmann is a researcher in distributed systems at the University of Cambridge, and the author of the highly acclaimed «Designing Data-Intensive Applications» (O'Reilly Media, 2017). 

Kevin Scott, CTO at Microsoft once said: «This book should be required reading for software engineers. Designing Data-Intensive Applications is a rare resource that connects theory and practice to help developers make smart decisions as they design and implement data infrastructure and systems.»

Martin’s main research interests include collaboration software, CRDTs, and formal verification of distributed algorithms. Previously he was a software engineer and an entrepreneur at several Internet companies including LinkedIn and Rapportive, where he worked on large-scale data infrastructure.

Vadim Tsesko (@incubos) is a lead software engineer at Odnoklassniki who works in Core Platform team. Vadim’s scientific and engineering interests include distributed systems, data warehouses and verification of software systems.

Contents:


  • Moving from business to academic research;
  • Discussion of «Designing Data-Intensive Applications»;
  • Common sense against artificial hype and aggressive marketing;
  • Pitfalls of CAP theorem and other industry mistakes;
  • Benefits of decentralization;
  • Blockchains, Dat, IPFS, Filecoin, WebRTC;
  • New CRDTs. Formal verification with Isabelle;
  • Event sourcing. Low level approach. XA transactions; 
  • Apache Kafka, PostgreSQL, Memcached, Redis, Elasticsearch;
  • How to apply all that tools to real life;
  • Expected target audience of Martin’s talks and the Hydra conference.

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Total votes 13: ↑12 and ↓1 +11
Views 1.8K
Comments 0

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Алексей Федоров