• FAQ about laser correction ReLEx SMILE: yes, in Russia there is, but no, in Russia there isn’t

    • Translation


    — Are small-invasive laser vision correction operations done in Russia using the Small Incision Lenticule Extraction method?

    Yes, about 10 years already. Every year, more and more at conferences of ophthalmologists, questions arise not at the level of “What is this?”, But at specific practical nuances of technology. VisuMax lasers exist in several clinics in Russia, but it is much less used under ReLEx SMILE than under femtoLASIK. Historically, it happened in Russia that this technology is little used in the central part and is actively used beyond the Urals.

    — What is the story with licenses for specific operations?

    Zeiss sells cones with licenses. A cone — a replacement part adjacent to the eye — is purchased with a license to use a laser procedure, usually in batches of 10 or 100 operations. For example, 10 cones and 10 licenses are received. Licenses are driven through the laser menu, and it allows you to use the appropriate cones for the appropriate program types. Licenses for SMILE separately, for femtoLASIK separately, for FLEX, rings and additional corrections are also separate licenses. Most manufacturers of femtosecond and some excimer lasers have a similar situation. Licenses for excimer operations are not needed, perhaps, except on models of about 5 years old and older.

    — And you can not get such a license for SMILE?

    Easily. Firstly, this module in the laser is as an expensive option, so the device itself without the SMILE option is cheaper. Secondly, if this option is available, then licenses to carry out the operation ReLEx SMILE can be acquired only after conducting 5–10 test runs on pig eyes, then performing at least 10 femtoLASIK operations on patients, then 50 FLEX operations, and only after that Buy a SMILE license for a specific surgeon.
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  • A couple more unobvious things that you might not be told before laser vision correction

    • Translation

    Today, without the «tin», as you asked

    There is already a post about how the laser cuts by creating millions of cavitation bubbles in the cornea layer of the eye, and analyzing telemetry from the real operation in seconds with comments of the surgeon's actions.

    Now FAQ about various related things


    — If I look away while the laser is running, what will happen?

    You simply will not work. In fact, immediately after anesthesia, the eye is pressed against a special pneumocapture. To blink at you too will not leave because of fixing (it is not long and not for long). The only moment where it is possible to seriously disrupt the course of the operation is to pull the head down strongly, pulling it out of the headrest by a serious willed effort. In this case, the operation will instantly stop. More precisely, it will stop even before the loss of capture (details below).

    — How should an operating room be prepared?

    In general — as a normal operating room, that is, a room with a clean area (air filtration, overpressure to prevent contamination from the outside after cleaning). It is important for the procedure that microparticles of dust flying in the air do not fall between the laser lens and the eye.
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  • Four Ways Quantum Computing Will Change Artificial Intelligence Forever

      If science were a dating app, quantum physics and machine learning probably wouldn’t be a match. They’re from completely different fields and often require completely different backgrounds and skills. But, throw in a little quantum computing and, suddenly, that science-matchmaking app becomes Tinder and the attraction between the two is palpable.

      image

      (Credit: cmo.adobe.com/articles/2017/5/how-will-artificial-intelligence-impact-business-tlp-ptr.html#gs.5zlifl)

      Even though the extent of change that quantum computing will unleash on AI is up for debate, many experts now more than suspect that quantum computing will definitely alter AI at some level. Analysts from bank holding company BBVA, for example, point toward the natural synergy between quantum computing and AI as reasons why quantum machine learning will eventually best classical machine learning.

      “Quantum machine learning can be more efficient than classic machine learning, at least for certain models that are intrinsically hard to learn using conventional computers,” says Samuel Fernández Lorenzo, a quantum algorithm researcher who collaborates with BBVA’s New Digital Businesses area. “We still have to find out to what extent do these models appear in practical applications.”
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    • Laser telemetry for vision correction: a complete operation with comments (not for the faint of heart)

      • Translation
      Now I will show what doctors usually never show to patients. More precisely, it shows everything in the form of a beautiful render, from which it does not follow at all that a piece of metal will stick up in your cornea for a couple of minutes. Fortunately, you will not feel this because of the anesthetic premedication, you will not know and do not remember, because the piece of iron will be out of focus.



      So, watch the video, and I will show the frames with comments. This is a real operation on a patient in a German clinic, the recording was made on a device like the “black box” of the VisuMAX device. In this case, the patient has agreed to use the recording for training purposes, usually access to such records is strictly limited.
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    • Laser that cuts inside the cornea: ReLEx procedure at the physical level

      • Translation
      The idea — to take and cut a lens in a transparent cornea — is not new. At first it was done manually, with a scalpel directly on the surface (difficult and very rough, with a sea of side effects). The first laser was used in 1979, then it was a pulsed infrared emitter with an effective pulse length of 4 nanoseconds.


      Step 1: creating a plasma bubble, in fact — a microburst. Step 2: expansion of the shock and heat waves. Step 3: cavitation bubble (plasma expansion). Step 4: the formation of a parallel slice at the expense of several adjacent laser focus points.

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    • Agile English teaching. What is it?



        Modern-day agile English teaching has come to take the place of rigid, cut-and-dried lessons that are fast becoming a thing of the past.

        Let me clarify what I mean by agile teaching that is bound to substitute conventional teaching.

        Some decades ago and up until recently it was perfectly valid to choose a certain textbook and go through it module by module together with your students (be it a group or individual learners). Given the abundance of high-quality materials readily accessible online and offline, it is completely unthinkable to proceed with this outdated approach.
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      • AdBlock has stolen the banner, but banners are not teeth — they will be back

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      • Why I keep track of spendings in a personal app made with Git+JS

        • Translation

        Hi, folks, let me share my experience of creating an application to keep track of my spendings. Specifically, let me do it by answering the following questions:


        1. Why keep track of spendings in an application?
        2. Why did I create the application as a personal project?
        3. Why does the project use Git+JS?

        1. Why keep track of spendings in an application?


        I, like many people out there, wanted to become rich and successful. To become rich, one is often advised to run a personal budget, that's what I started to do several years ago. I'd like to point out that running my personal budget hasn't made me rich and successful, and I increased income simply by moving to Moscow.

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      • Could Quantum Computing Help Reverse Climate Change?

          The unique powers of quantum computation may give humanity an important weapon — or several weapons — against climate change, according to one quantum computer pioneer.
          One of the possible solutions for the excess carbon in the atmosphere and to reach global climate goals is to suck it out. It sounds pretty easy, but, in fact, the technology to do so cheaply and easily isn’t quite here yet, according to Jeremy O’Brien Chief Executive Officer, PsiQuantum, a quantum computing startup.

          Currently, there is no way to simulate large complex molecules, like carbon dioxide. Current classical computers cannot simulate these types of molecules because the problem grows exponentially with the size or complexity of the simulated molecules, according to O’Brien, who wrote an article outlining the issue at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting held recently.

          “Crudely speaking, if simulating a molecule with 10 atoms takes a minute, a molecule with 11 takes two minutes, one with 12 atoms takes four minutes and so on,” he writes. “This exponential scaling quickly renders a traditional computer useless: simulating a molecule with just 70 atoms would take longer than the lifetime of the universe (13 billion years).”
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        • Porting packages to buildroot using the Zabbix example

          • Tutorial


          The basics of porting


          Originally, Buildroot offers a limited number of packages. It makes sense — there is everything you need, but any other packages can be added.


          To add a package, create 2 description files, an optional checksum file, and add a link to the package in the general package list. There are hooks at different stages of the build. At the same time, Buildroot can recognize the needed type of packages:

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        • Blood sugar and COVID-19

            Novel pandemic is very new for science, often it takes years before scientists prove connection of risk factors and replicate their findings in experimental setups, but it is not the case to wait. I have been observing different facts about COVID-19 and propose “Hypothesis for connection between blood sugar levels and infection”. The only reason I do this now with so many controversies is that I genuinely believe it can save lives. Lives of my friends, and their relatives.

            In the article below I summarise my knowledge on infection and immunity, back it up by links to COVID observations of doctors and scientific papers.
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          • Working with light: Starting your career at ITMO University

              One of our previous articles featured an overview of our photonics department students’ work lives. Today we’re going to expand on this topic by looking at four related MA programs: “Light Guide Photonics and Programmable Electronics”, “LED technologies and optoelectronics”, “Photonic materials” and “Laser technologies”. We sat down with some of the folks currently enrolled in these programs, as well as recent graduates, to talk about the role ITMO University played in kickstarting their careers.

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            • Scientists Turn a Quantum Computer into a Time Machine — At least, for a Second…

                Scientists said they were able to return the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past, according to a university press release. The researchers, who are from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, along with colleagues from the U.S. and Switzerland, also calculated the probability that an electron in empty interstellar space will spontaneously travel back into its recent past. The study came out recently in Scientific Reports.
                “This is one in a series of papers on the possibility of violating the second law of thermodynamics. That law is closely related to the notion of the arrow of time that posits the one-way direction of time: from the past to the future,” commented the study’s lead author Gordey Lesovik, who heads the Laboratory of the Physics of Quantum Information Technology at MIPT.

                While the researchers don’t expect you to take a trip back to the high school prom just yet, they added that the time reversal algorithm could prove useful for making quantum computers more precise.

                “Our algorithm could be updated and used to test programs written for quantum computers and eliminate noise and errors,” Lebedev explained.

                The researchers said that the work builds on some earlier work that recently garnered headlines.

                “We began by describing a so-called local perpetual motion machine of the second kind. Then, in December, we published a paper that discusses the violation of the second law via a device called a Maxwell’s demon,” Lesovik said. “The most recent paper approaches the same problem from a third angle: We have artificially created a state that evolves in a direction opposite to that of the thermodynamic arrow of time.”
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              • Research in rejuvenation biotechnology – where are we now?



                  Certainly this event is an example of some of the people in our longevity community coming in and just taking over a little bit of somebody else's conference to talk about longevity… but really exposing the rest of the community to it. I'm finding that at every event I go to, I'd really love to have conference presentations where I get to talk about some interesting thing about the longevity industry, because there are a lot of really interesting things going on.

                  But every presentation turns out to be «hey, we exist, please notice us — because this is really, really important.» Everything that you guys think that you are doing in medicine is about to be up-ended, because suddenly we're going to be actually able to stop people from getting sick and incapacitated and debilitated in old age. This is happening right now, the first rejuvenation therapies exist. But nobody notices.
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                • Simple and free video conferencing

                    Due to a rapid increase in remote work, we have decided to offer video conferencing. Like most of our services, it is free of charge. It is built on a reliable open-source solution, it is mostly based on WebRTC, which allows communicating in the browser by just clicking on a link. Below we’ll tell you more about its features and some of the problems we’ve run into.


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                  • 14 Successful Ways to Use Live Video Streaming for Business in 2020

                      Live streaming is engaging precisely because it is so easy to access. All one needs to tune in is a screen, an internet connection and access to streaming sites. Today, business live streaming has been incorporated into media-heavy platforms like YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. However, the best way to live stream, and how to use live streams for business, depend on your product and business goals.

                      "

                      New to the live streaming game? It’s a great time to test the waters and figure out how to live stream a business, now that a majority of the population is more hooked to their social media platforms than ever before. Here are the best ways to live stream a business that are also engaging, informative and business-goal-oriented.

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                    • MEMS accelerometers, magnetometers and orientation angles

                      • Translation


                      When it's necessary to evaluate the orientation angles of an object you may have the question — which MEMS sensor to choose. Sensors manufacturers provide a great amount of different parameters and it may be hard to understand if the sensor fit your needs.

                      Brief: this article is the description of the Octave/Matlab script which allows to estimate the orientation angles evaluation errors, derived from MEMS accelerometers and magnetometers measurements. The input data for the script are datasheet parameters for the sensors. Article can be useful for those who start using MEMS sensors in their devices. You can find the project on GitHub.
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                    • The World’s Top 12 Quantum Computing Research Universities

                      In just a few years, quantum computing and quantum information theory has gone from a fringe subject offered in small classes at odd hours in the corner of the physics building annex to a full complement of classes in well-funded programs being held at quantum centers and institutes at leading universities.

                      The question now for many would-be quantum computer students is not, “Are there universities that even offer classes in quantum computing,” but, rather, “Which universities are leaders at quantum computing research.”

                      We’ll look at some of the best right now:

                      The Institute for Quantum Computing — University of Waterloo


                      The University of Waterloo can proudly declare that, while many universities avoided offering quantum computing classes like cat adoption agencies avoided adoption applications from the Schrodinger family, this Canadian university went all in.

                      And it paid off.
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                    • The snail terrarium concept

                      • Translation
                      Hello everybody! Today I want to share with you the concept of a rather unusual device, which, like the alarm remote for the "ZAZ Zaporozhets", was developed exclusively for creative purposes, without the further implementation.



                      It all started with the fact that two of the three grape snails escaped from our director's terrarium, and the third one died suddenly without lasting even three days. Obviously, the blame for this situation was putted not on the inability to keep the mollusk and irresponsibility, but on the “terrible terrarium”.
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                    • The concept of a car alarm remote for «ZAZ Zaporozhets»

                      • Translation
                      Hello friends! My name is Ruslan Mazur, I am an industrial designer. In my free time I like to invent and visualize devices that are not designed for production, but allow you to do creativity. Regardless of the technical difficulties, the cost of the product and so on.

                      For three years now I have been working at Tabula Sense Company and most of the time I have been developing various furniture with built-in electronics.



                      Today I want to share with you the concept of a car alarm remote control for ZAZ Zaporozhets (or Fiat 600, whatever suits you best), as if the similar devices already existed in those days.
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