• Achieve more with Microsoft Game Stack

      Microsoft Game Stack


      Microsoft is built on the belief of empowering people and organizations to achieve more – it is the DNA of our company. We are announcing a new initiative, Microsoft Game Stack, in which we commit to bringing together Microsoft tools and services that will empower game developers like yourself, whether you’re an indie developer just starting out or a AAA studio, to achieve more.


      This is the start of a new journey, and today we are only taking the first steps. We believe Microsoft is uniquely suited to deliver on that commitment. Our company has a long legacy in games – and in building developer-focused platforms.


      There are 2 billion gamers in the world today, playing a broad range of games, on a broad range of devices. There is as much focus on video streaming, watching, and sharing within a community as there is on playing or competing. As game creators, you strive every day to continuously engage your players, to spark their imaginations, and inspire them, regardless of where they are, or what device they’re using. We’re introducing Microsoft Game Stack, to help you do exactly that.

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    • My and my girlfriend’s first video game. Development with Unity. Part 1

        If not to take into account releases for Android and a dozen of abandoned projects just before they were ready, then yes, it is our first game appropriate for more than one platform. How did it all start? Very simply. We worked on another project, let’s call it “project A”, and we’d been working on it for a long time when we decided to make a game during a couple of months and use it to train our marketing skills, and then immediately release our “project A” when we would be more experienced in the promotion of games. But the plan failed and “project A” was kept untouched for the whole year. But this story isn’t about “project A”, it’s about a logical game called «Cubicity: Slide puzzle».


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      • Levelord, an Ordinary Moscow Resident: Interview with the Creator of Duke Nukem

          RUVDS together with Habr.com continues the series of interviews with interesting people in computer field. Previously we met Boris Yangel, who heads AI development of Yandex’s Alice voice assistant.

          Today we bring you an interview with Richard (Levelord) Gray — level designer of such legendary games as Duke Nukem, American McGee Alice, Heavy Metal F.A.K.K.2, SiN, and Serious Sam. And he is the one who coined the famous phrase «You are not supposed to be here». Richard was born and spent most of his life in USA, but several years ago he moved to Moscow to his russian wife and daughter.

          These who speak to Richard are Nick Zemlyanskiy, editor of Habr.com, and Nikita Tsaplin, co-founder and managing partner of RUVDS company.


          → Text and video in Russian
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        • Low-budget stereo rendering in few lines of code (stereogram, anaglyph, stereoscope)

          • Tutorial
          Another weekend has come, which means I am am writing another couple dozen lines of code and make an illustration or two. In previous articles I’ve explained how to do ray tracing and even blow stuff up. This might surprise you, but computer graphics is quite easy: even a couple hundred lines of bare C++ can produce some very exciting imagery.

          Today’s topic is binocular vision, and we won’t even break the 100 lines barrier doing it. Since we can draw 3D scenes, it’d be foolish to ignore stereo pairs, so today we’ll make something like this:


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        • Designing Sound for Pathfinder: Kingmaker


            Pathfinder: Kingmaker (PF:K for short) is a role-playing video game created by Owlcat Games, released in Fall 2018 on Steam and GoG. Inspired by classic Bioware games, this project uses a popular board game system ruleset, combat takes place in Real-Time with Pause, follows an isometric camera, and has a non-linear story with multiple unique endings.


            In this article, I will share a little about how we worked on designing the audio throughout the game’s development including task management, the search for inspiration, and troubleshooting. An experienced specialist may not find anything particularly groundbreaking in this recap, but beginners and enthusiasts will definitely discover some points of interest.

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          • Valentine's Day Application on Libgdx

            • Translation

            Every year there are a lot of articles dedicated to Valentine's Day. I also decided to get involved in this topic and create something original and unusual. The idea was to create a simple Android application with hearts that would have their physical models and interact with each other. Then I added text, sounds, particles and some other effects. The resulting app was working and quite original! In this article I will describe the creation process, as well as the capabilities and pitfalls of the libgdx library.


            Valentines Day Hearts.

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          • Videogame monsters: how to sow fear

            • Tutorial

            In video games, enemies are one of the key figures, without which a game might lose its meaning, and when it’s not only enemies, but terrifying monsters, they often create the chilling atmosphere intended by the developers. It’s impossible to imagine Silent Hill without the Pyramid Head, or Outlast without Chris Walker, and so on, you get the idea. Monsters are a cumulative image of a video game enemy, and it’s not necessarily an ugly demon or a giant spider: even an angry neighbor, like in Hello Neighbor, is a monster despite his human appearance.

            This is where the reader probably asks:


            what’s the point of this article?
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