• Make it easier to get finished: Interview with John Romero, developer of Doom

      At the last Tech Train IT festival, we met the legendary John Romero, who designed and developed the iconic Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, and Quake. We talked about whether game developers need soft skills, which working tools to pay attention to, and which co-founder of Id Software's favorite toys are. Questions were asked by Nikita Tsaplin, the founder of RUVDS.


      → Text and video in Russian
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    • Making games is [not] hard. Looking back at small mobile project on Unity3D

        When you have an idea of a new game mechanic, or even flash of interesting concept — soon you'll be obsessed about it with an immense urge to start doing something already. Sometimes you write such ideas down somewhere and bring them a chance to ignite full development cycle later. But I've stumbled upon the opposite action. My current game became this giant monster eating finance and time, and grown much bigger than I ever thought. So, I've needed to put it back for a while. But I could not sit without game development, and in my free time I've started to work on my new project! Plus that one was quite different from the previous ones, because I've decided to target mobile. If you are interested in how this project was done, from a small idea to the final release, then let's dive into it!


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      • My and my girlfriend’s first video game. Development with Unity. Part 1

          If not to take into account releases for Android and a dozen of abandoned projects just before they were ready, then yes, it is our first game appropriate for more than one platform. How did it all start? Very simply. We worked on another project, let’s call it “project A”, and we’d been working on it for a long time when we decided to make a game during a couple of months and use it to train our marketing skills, and then immediately release our “project A” when we would be more experienced in the promotion of games. But the plan failed and “project A” was kept untouched for the whole year. But this story isn’t about “project A”, it’s about a logical game called «Cubicity: Slide puzzle».


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        • Levelord, an Ordinary Moscow Resident: Interview with the Creator of Duke Nukem

            RUVDS together with Habr.com continues the series of interviews with interesting people in computer field. Previously we met Boris Yangel, who heads AI development of Yandex’s Alice voice assistant.

            Today we bring you an interview with Richard (Levelord) Gray — level designer of such legendary games as Duke Nukem, American McGee Alice, Heavy Metal F.A.K.K.2, SiN, and Serious Sam. And he is the one who coined the famous phrase «You are not supposed to be here». Richard was born and spent most of his life in USA, but several years ago he moved to Moscow to his russian wife and daughter.

            These who speak to Richard are Nick Zemlyanskiy, editor of Habr.com, and Nikita Tsaplin, co-founder and managing partner of RUVDS company.


            → Text and video in Russian
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          • Creator of while True: learn() on programming in game development, VR issues and machine learning simulation

            • Translation


            A few years ago I had a feeling that Oleg Chumakov (then working at the game studio Nival) was the most famous programmer in the game development industry. He was giving speeches, hosted Gamesjams and frequently showed up on the podcast How games are made.

            When VR hit the market, Oleg was chosen to lead the company’s new department — NivalVR. But, as you probably know, VR didn’t quite take off as much as people expected.

            I kind of moved to other to other things in life and stopped keeping up with game development for a while, but after getting into it again I noticed that things were looking up for Oleg’s team. Now it’s called Luden.io, and their machine learning expert simulator, while True: learn() became a huge hit in its admittedly small niche. Lots of cool stories are happening around the game and the team.

            We decided to do an interview with Oleg, but I couldn’t stick to one topic — his life up to this moment has been, for the lack of a better word, “interesting”. He’s seen it all. And, to ensure that a programmer could talk about programming without fear of looking too “nerdy”, the interview was conducted by my friend, colleague and an experienced developer of its own fillpackart.
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