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Exploring the Capabilities and Implications of ChatGPT 3 in the Educational Technology Field

Reading time 24 min
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Artificial Intelligence
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From language translation and virtual assistants to self-driving cars and personalized recommendations, AI has been a buzzword for a while now, but it seems that it is only now with the new ChatGPT 3 being released to the public that it is so close to revolutionizing the educational technology field as well. In this article, I would like to give my first impressions, test results, and insights on the new technology.

ChatGPT is a chatbot by OpenAI that can write texts, code, answer questions, and solve various problems. It can even write college essays that, although lacking heart and personal touch, are still pretty good.

It somehow reminds me of the times when distance learning started captivating different fields and what started as a tool for kids with special needs (about 15 years ago, it was a major theme in pedagogical universities, at least) turned into massive online open courses from top universities available to anyone with access to the internet. In corporate learning culture, it went from "e-learning is a cheap and less effective replacement for offline trainings" to being a part of a complicated educational system where we can have the best qualities of offline and online learning for employees.

Right away, serious discussions emerged on the threats to the usage of ChatGPT. Since the beginning of December, many educators have been giving their opinion on its ability to write essays, code, and find correct answers for tests and on the studying culture that will probably need to change.

The first look at the new technology seems fearful. The new technology shows capabilities that could pose a challenge for various professional educators as they express concerns that it will become an ultimate cheat sheet for students, destroy the educational process, or become a source of misinformation.

Many educators, including me, rushed into testing its capabilities and started wondering how it would change the work of instructional designers. So here is what I found out through the testing process.

Ability to explain

The first thing I wanted to try is to experiment with the complexity of answers and language chosen for different ages. You are probably aware of a 5 levels WIRED show on YouTube where you need to explain a concept to a child, a teen, a college student, a grad student,  and an expert in the field. The ability to explain something on different levels requires skill. First, I tried simple prompts but the whole trick with this system is use very detailed prompts thus you receive better results.

Q: Explain AI to a child, a teen, a college student, a grad AI student and to an expert in the field of AI, specify why you choose specific language, give appropriate examples for each person

A: Sure, here is a summary of how I would explain artificial intelligence (AI) to different audiences, along with the reasoning behind my language choices and examples for each group:

For a child: I would use simple and clear language and provide concrete examples of AI in action to help them understand the concept. For example: "AI is when computers and machines can do tasks that usually only humans can do, like understanding and talking in different languages, or recognizing and remembering people's faces. For example, a computer program that can play chess is using AI because it can think about its next move and try to beat its opponent. AI can also be used to help people do their jobs, like in a self-driving car or a robot that helps doctors operate."

For a teenager: I would use more technical language and provide more in-depth examples to engage their curiosity and challenge their understanding. For example: "AI is a field of computer science and engineering that focuses on the development of intelligent machines that can think, learn, and act like humans. AI systems are designed to analyze and process data, and to make decisions based on that data. Some examples of AI include virtual assistants like Siri or Alexa, which can understand and respond to voice commands, and self-driving cars, which use sensors and algorithms to navigate roads and make driving decisions. As a teenager, you may be interested in studying AI in the future because it is a rapidly growing field with many exciting career opportunities."

For a college student: I would use more technical language and provide more advanced examples to reflect their level of understanding and prepare them for further study in the field. For example: "AI is a field of computer science and engineering that focuses on the development of intelligent machines that can think, learn, and act like humans. AI systems are designed to analyze and process data, and to make decisions based on that data. Some examples of AI include medical diagnosis systems, which use machine learning to analyze patient data and make treatment recommendations, and fraud detection systems, which can analyze financial transactions and identify suspicious activity. As a college student, you may be considering majoring in AI because it is a rapidly growing field with many exciting career opportunities and the potential to make a positive impact on society."

For a graduate AI student: I would use more technical language and provide more specialized examples to reflect their advanced level of understanding and focus on their specific area of study. For example: "AI is a field of computer science and engineering that focuses on the development of intelligent machines that can think, learn, and act like humans. AI systems are designed to analyze and process data, and to make decisions based on that data. Some examples of AI include natural language processing systems, which can analyze and understand human language, and computer vision systems, which can analyze and understand images and videos. As a graduate AI student, you are likely familiar with the latest research and techniques in the field, and may be working on developing AI systems or studying their impacts. You may also be aware of the ethical and societal implications of AI, and be working to address these issues."

For an expert in the field of AI: I would use technical language and provide specialized and in-depth examples to reflect their expertise and engage their knowledge and experience. For example: "AI is a field of computer science and engineering that focuses on the development of intelligent machines that can think, learn, and act like humans. AI systems are designed to analyze and process data, and to make decisions based on that data. Some examples of AI include deep learning systems, which use artificial neural networks to learn and adapt to new tasks, and reinforcement learning systems, which can learn from experience and optimize their actions to maximize rewards. As an expert in the field, you are likely familiar with the various approaches to AI, such as supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and semi-supervised learning, and the strengths and limitations of each. You may also be working on developing new AI algorithms and architectures, or applying AI to solve real-world problems in fields such as healthcare, finance, and transportation. In addition, you may be aware of the ethical and societal implications of AI, and be working to ensure that AI is developed and used responsibly and ethically."

Clearly, this is a helicopter view on the matter but still could be used as a starting point. Various educational applications are possible in this case like personalized language for newcomers and experienced employees or different levels for language learners, we could ask students to analyze the language used by the machine and elaborate more on the matter.

Knowledge about language learning

Q: Write sentences meaning the same about nature as a student of English of different levels. Use CEFR levels.

A: Here are six sentences that mean the same thing, but are written at different levels of proficiency according to the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages):

A1: "Nature is beautiful."

A2: "The natural world is beautiful."

B1: "The beauty of nature is undeniable."

B2: "Nature's beauty is a source of inspiration and wonder."

C1: "The aesthetic appeal of the natural world is a constant source of marvel."

C2: "The sublime beauty of nature never ceases to captivate and
amaze."

The system knows what CEFR levels are and is able to use different language accordingly. It also knows at least some of the grammar rules.

Q: When should I use present simple specify all possible use situations

A: There are several situations in which the present simple tense is used:

To describe a habit or routine: "I eat breakfast every morning."

To describe a general truth or fact: "The sun rises in the east."

To describe a schedule or timetable: "The train leaves at 8:00 a.m."

To describe a state or condition that is currently true: "I live in New York."

To describe a characteristic or quality that is permanent or long-lasting: "She is a kind person."

To give instructions or directions: "Open the door and turn left."

To describe a future event that has already been planned or arranged: "I fly to Paris next week."

To describe a situation in a story or narrative: "He walks to the
store and buys a newspaper."

Q: Write sentences with grammar structure present perfect for different levels of students: A1, A2, B1,B2, C1,C2 and use vocabulary in sentences according to the level.

A: Here are three sentences in the present perfect tense for different levels of students, using vocabulary appropriate for each level:

A1: "I have eaten my lunch." (This simple sentence uses the present perfect to describe a recent action that has been completed.)

A2: "I have finished my homework." (This sentence uses the present perfect to describe a completed action that has relevance to the present.)

B1: "I have been studying English for three years." (This sentence uses the present perfect to describe an action that started in the past and continues up until the present.)

B2: "I have just received an email from my boss." (This sentence uses the present perfect to describe a recent event that has consequences in the present.)

C1: "I have learned a plethora of new AI techniques since I began my graduate program." (This sentence uses the present perfect to describe an action that started in the past and has been completed recently, with an emphasis on the result of the action. The word "plethora" is a more advanced vocabulary word meaning a large number or quantity.)

C2: "I have developed a deep understanding of machine learning algorithms and their applications in the field of AI." (This sentence uses the present perfect to describe an action that started in the past and has been completed recently, with an emphasis on the result of the action. The word "deep" is a more advanced vocabulary word meaning thorough or extensive.)

Perform roleplays and assess language knowledge

Probably the most interesting tests are about different role plays. The system tested my knowledge of the Present Simple Tense. I gave 3 wrong answers and 2 correct answers, and as a result, I received the following recommendations.

Q: I want you to act as an English language teacher. I will be a student and you will ask me 5 multiple-choice questions to assess my knowledge of Present Simple tense. Do not write all questions at once. Ask me questions one by one and wait for my answers. Do not select and write answers for me. After all, five questions assess my knowledge and give recommendations on what to improve and learn.

A: Here is the fifth and final question:

Which of the following sentences is written in the present simple tense? a) I am playing video games. b) I play video games. c) I will play video games.

Please select the correct answer.

 Q: C

 A: Sorry, but the correct answer is option b: "I play video games." The present simple tense is used to describe a habit or routine. In this sentence, the verb "play" is in the present simple form, indicating that the action of playing video games is a regular occurrence.

Based on your answers, it seems that you have a good understanding of the present simple tense in English. You are able to use it correctly to describe habits and routines.

To become more proficient in the present simple tense, it might be helpful to practice using it in a variety of contexts and with different verb tenses. You could also try reading and listening to materials in English that make use of the present simple, such as news articles or conversations with native speakers.

Overall, your knowledge of the present simple tense is strong, and with some additional practice and exposure, you should be able to continue to improve your skills in this area.

I think any English teacher would agree that this assessment is very poor and recommendations, though have the right to exist, are very superficial.

Give feedback and apply the given advice

Q: Give feedback on the following writing. Provide feedback on how to improve grammar, vocabulary, and style. In any life situation possible I prefer not to get carried away but to stay sane. For example, if I knew that the economic situation in the country was getting worse and that would possibly affect my job I would be the calmest person on earth. First I am a qualified specialist so I never get either obsessed or too worried about the idea of me being fired, about years of seniority, and so on. I never feel that my job is on the line because even if I lose my job I will never lose my profession. Second I prefer not to beat around the bush and if it is possible to find some truthful information. So the best decision for me is not to get worked up and to believe that managers of our company will stand by the interests of their employees.

A: Here are a few suggestions for improving the grammar, vocabulary, and style of the text: In the first sentence, the word "situation" should be singular, so it should be "any life situation possible." In the second sentence, "getting worse" should be "worsen." In the third sentence, "either obsessed of too worried" should be "either obsessed or too worried." In the fifth sentence, "on the line" should be "in jeopardy." In the sixth sentence, "years of seniority" is not a clear phrase. You might consider revising this to specify what you mean. In the seventh sentence, "to beat around the bush" means to avoid addressing a topic directly. It might be more clear to say "to avoid beating around the bush" or "to be straightforward." In the eighth sentence, "to get worked up" means to become agitated or upset. It might be more clear to say "to avoid getting worked up" or "to remain calm." In terms of vocabulary, you might consider using a wider range of words to convey your ideas more vividly. For example, instead of using "calm," you could use words like "unflappable," "level-headed," or "cool under pressure." In terms of style, the text is clear and easy to understand, but you might consider adding more detail or examples to further illustrate your points. You could also consider breaking up the text into shorter paragraphs to make it more visually appealing.

Q: Rewrite this text applying all recommendations above.

A: In any life situation possible, I prefer to stay sane and avoid getting carried away. For instance, if I were aware that the economic situation in the country were worsening and might potentially impact my job, I would remain calm and collected. Firstly, as a qualified specialist, I am not prone to becoming either obsessed or excessively worried about the prospect of losing my job or my years of seniority. I do not feel that my job is in jeopardy because even if I were to lose it, I would not lose my profession. Secondly, I prefer to be straightforward and avoid beating around the bush, especially when it is possible to find honest information. Therefore, the best course of action for me is to stay composed and trust that the managers of our company will prioritize the interests of their employees.

Provide assistance to educators

Q: What is better e-learning or offline learning?

A: It is difficult to say definitively which method is better, as it ultimately depends on the individual learner and the specific situation. Here are some factors to consider when deciding between e-learning and offline learning: E-learning: Can be more convenient and flexible, as it can often be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection Allows for a wide range of multimedia content, such as videos and interactive exercises May be more cost-effective, as there are no travel or accommodation expenses Offline learning: May be more engaging and interactive, as it often involves face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers Can provide a more immersive learning experience, as the learner is fully immersed in the learning environment May be more suitable for certain subjects or skills that require hands-on practice or demonstration Ultimately, the best learning method will depend on the learner's needs, preferences, and goals. It may be helpful to consider a combination of both e-learning and offline learning to find the best balance for your needs.

Q: Is it true that everyone has a learning style?

A: It is a common belief that people have different learning styles and that certain teaching methods are more effective for some learners than others. However, research has not consistently supported the idea of distinct learning styles. While some studies have found that people may have preferences for certain types of learning, these preferences do not consistently predict learning outcomes or success. Instead, research suggests that a variety of teaching approaches can be effective for different learners and that the most effective way to learn is to use a combination of methods. Factors such as the complexity of the material, the learner's prior knowledge and experience, and the goals of the learning experience may all play a role in determining the most effective approach.

Q: What other learning myth are common?

A: There are several common learning myths that have been widely believed, but have been proven to be false or unsupported by research: Some people are naturally "good" at learning, while others are not. In reality, anyone can learn effectively if they are motivated and provided with the right resources and support. Learning styles are fixed and cannot be changed. While some people may prefer certain learning methods over others, it is possible to adapt to different learning styles and methods with practice and effort. Learning is a solitary activity. While some people may prefer to learn independently, research has shown that collaborative learning can be more effective in some cases. Repetition is the key to learning. While repetition can be helpful in certain situations, it is not always the most effective way to learn. It is best to learn one thing at a time. Research has shown that people can often learn more effectively when they are exposed to multiple concepts at once, as long as they are presented in a way that is meaningful and relevant.

Q: Provide resources on learning myths

A: Here are some resources on learning myths:

"7 Myths About Learning" by Harold D. Stolovitch and Erica J. Keeps: https://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107022/chapters/7-Myths-About-Learning.aspx

"10 Learning Myths Debunked" by EdTech Magazine: https://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/05/10-learning-myths-debunked

"The Top 5 Learning Myths" by Robert Bjork: https://www.edutopia.org/article/top-5-learning-myths-robert-bjork

"5 Common Learning Myths Debunked" by eLearning Industry: https://www.elearningindustry.com/learning-myths-debunked

"10 Myths About Learning and Memory" by Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/brain-babble/201309/10-myths-about-learning-and-memory

Q: I have a student with ADHD how can I improve online webinars to help this student

A: There are several ways to improve online webinars for students with ADHD:
Use engaging and interactive content: Using videos, games, and interactive activities can help hold the student's attention and keep them engaged in the material.
Break up the content into smaller chunks: Long lectures can be overwhelming for students with ADHD. Consider breaking up the content into smaller, more manageable chunks and using breaks between sessions to allow for rest and refocus.
Use visual aids: Visual aids such as charts, graphs, and images can help students with ADHD better understand and retain the material.
Provide accommodations: Consider providing accommodations such as extra time on assignments or allowing the student to take breaks as needed.
Use assistive technology: Assistive technology such as text-to-speech software or a virtual whiteboard can help students with ADHD better access and engage with the material.
Encourage participation: Encourage the student to ask questions and participate in discussions to help them stay engaged and focused.

Set course objectives

Q: Set objectives for a course on blended learning

A: Here are some potential objectives for a course on blended learning:
To understand the principles and benefits of blended learning, and how it differs from traditional face-to-face and online learning.
To learn how to design and implement a blended learning course, including selecting appropriate technologies and resources.
To develop strategies for effectively engaging students and promoting active learning in a blended learning environment.
To explore best practices for assessing student learning and progress in a blended learning course.
To learn how to troubleshoot and solve common challenges and issues that may arise in a blended learning course.
To gain practical experience in using a variety of technologies and resources to support blended learning.
To build a professional network of peers and experts in the field of blended learning.
To develop skills in creating and curating digital content for blended learning courses.
To understand how to apply blended learning principles and practices to a specific subject area or discipline.
To create a plan for incorporating blended learning into one's own teaching practice.

Provide a plan for a course

Q: Create a course plan on blended learning

A: Here is a possible course plan for a course on blended learning:
Week 1: Introduction to blended learning
What is blended learning and how does it differ from traditional and online learning?
The benefits of blended learning for students and educators
An overview of the course and expectations for participation
Week 2: Designing a blended learning course
Identifying the goals and objectives of the course
Selecting appropriate technologies and resources
Creating a course schedule and plan
Week 3: Engaging students in a blended learning environment
Promoting active learning through online and face-to-face activities
Using discussion forums, group work, and other collaborative learning strategies
Encouraging student self-directed learning and motivation
Week 4: Assessing student learning and progress
Traditional and alternative assessment methods for blended learning
Providing feedback and support to students
Using data to improve the course and student learning
Week 5: Troubleshooting and problem-solving in a blended learning course
Common challenges and issues that may arise
Strategies for addressing and resolving problems
Seeking help and support from peers and experts
Week 6: Using technologies and resources to support blended learning
An overview of different technologies and resources available for blended learning
Best practices for using these tools effectively
Tips for selecting and integrating technologies and resources into the course
Week 7: Creating and curating digital content
Principles of effective digital content creation
Tips for creating and organizing online materials
Strategies for finding and using high-quality open educational resources
Week 8: Blended learning in specific subject areas and disciplines
How to apply blended learning principles and practices to a specific subject area or discipline
Examples of successful blended learning courses in various fields
Opportunities for collaboration and professional development within the discipline
Week 9: Incorporating blended learning into one's own teaching practice
Developing a plan for implementing blended learning in one's own course or program
Reflecting on the experience of the course and identifying areas for improvement
Sharing experiences and ideas with others in the field
Week 10: Conclusion and next steps
Recap of key concepts and skills learned in the course
Next steps for continuing professional development in blended

Create outcomes

Q: Create outcomes for a course on blended learning

A: Here are some possible outcomes for a course on blended learning:
Students will be able to explain the principles and benefits of blended learning and how it differs from traditional and online learning.
Students will be able to design and implement a blended learning course, including selecting appropriate technologies and resources.
Students will be able to use strategies for effectively engaging students and promoting active learning in a blended learning environment.
Students will be able to use best practices for assessing student learning and progress in a blended learning course.
Students will be able to troubleshoot and solve common challenges and issues that may arise in a blended learning course.
Students will be able to use a variety of technologies and resources to support blended learning.
Students will be able to create and curate digital content for blended learning courses.
Students will be able to apply blended learning principles and practices to a specific subject area or discipline.
Students will be able to develop a plan for incorporating blended learning into their own teaching practice.
Students will be able to contribute to a professional network of peers and experts in the field of blended learning.

Generate test questions

Q: Write several multiple choice questions to this passage: It is a common belief that people have different learning styles and that certain teaching methods are more effective for some learners than others. However, research has not consistently supported the idea of distinct learning styles. While some studies have found that people may have preferences for certain types of learning, these preferences do not consistently predict learning outcomes or success. Instead, research suggests that a variety of teaching approaches can be effective for different learners and that the most effective way to learn is to use a combination of methods. Factors such as the complexity of the material, the learner's prior knowledge and experience, and the goals of the learning experience may all play a role in determining the most effective approach.

A: Which of the following statements is NOT true according to the passage?
a) People have different learning styles
b) Certain teaching methods are more effective for some learners
c) Research consistently supports the idea of distinct learning styles
d) Preferences for certain types of learning consistently predict learning outcomes or success
Which of the following factors may play a role in determining the most effective approach to learning?
a) The learner's prior knowledge and experience
b) The complexity of the material
c) The learner's age d
) All of the above

Which of the following is the most effective way to learn according to the passage?
a) Using a single method of teaching
b) Using a combination of methods
c) Using the method preferred by the learner
d) Using the method recommended by the teacher

According to the passage, which of the following is NOT a reason why certain teaching methods may be more effective for some learners than others?
a) The learner's prior knowledge and experience
b) The complexity of the material
c) The learner's learning style
d) The goals of the learning experience

Create a story for a scenario-based learning

I provided details on the product as part of the previous prompt and after that asked to create a story for the course.

Q: Write a story of a client who successfully uses most features of the card for the course

A: Julia had always dreamed of traveling the world and experiencing new cultures, and she knew that the Visa Card would be the perfect companion on her adventures. She was particularly excited about the Priority Pass, which gave her access to over 1,300 airport lounges in more than 600 cities and 148 countries.
As soon as Julia received her Visa Card, she began planning her first trip. She used the Concierge Service to book her flights and hotels, and she was amazed at how helpful and efficient the service was. She even received a room upgrade at her hotel thanks to the Visa Luxury Hotels program, which was included with her card.
During her travels, Julia found herself in many different airports, and she was grateful to have the Priority Pass to help her relax and unwind. She used the app to find the nearest lounge and was always impressed by the comfortable seating, delicious food, and friendly staff. She even had the opportunity to use the spa at one of the lounges, which was a welcome treat after a long flight.
As Julia continued to use her Visa Card, she discovered more and more benefits that she had never even thought about. She used the Concierge Service to make restaurant reservations, book car rentals, and even plan a surprise birthday party for a friend. She was always impressed by how personal and attentive the service was, and she knew that she would never have been able to do all of these things without the help of the Visa Card.
In the end, Julia was grateful for all of the benefits that her Visa Card had provided her, and she knew that she would continue to rely on it for all of her future travels. She was grateful to have such a reliable and convenient way to make the most of her adventures around the world.

Generate case questions

Q: Write 3 story multiple choice questions describing a client situation and how it could be solved by the product. Specify correct answers.

A: You're planning a business trip to Europe and need to book a hotel. Which of the following options would be the most convenient and cost-effective way to book a hotel through the HVB Visa Infinite Card? a. Booking a hotel through a third-party website b. Booking a hotel directly with the hotel chain c. Using the Visa Luxury Hotels program to book a hotel Correct answer: c. Using the Visa Luxury Hotels program to book a hotel
You're planning a vacation to Thailand and want to make sure you have access to a comfortable place to rest during layovers at the airport. How can the HVB Visa Infinite Card help you with this? a. The card provides discounts on car rentals b. The card provides access to the Priority Pass airport lounges c. The card provides insurance coverage for lost luggage Correct answer: b. The card provides access to the Priority Pass airport lounges
You're at a conference in a foreign country and suddenly realize you left your passport in your hotel room. How can the HVB Visa Infinite Card help you solve this problem? a. The card provides discounts on car rentals b. The card provides access to the Priority Pass airport lounges c. The card provides access to the HVB Concierge Service, which can assist with personal requests and needs Correct answer: c. The card provides access to the HVB Concierge Service, which can assist with personal requests and needs

Create lesson plans

Q: Create on introductory Lesson plan on mobile learning

A: Lesson Title: Introduction to Mobile Learning
Objective: At the end of this lesson, students will be able to define mobile learning, identify its benefits and potential applications, and create a mobile learning lesson plan.
Materials:
Smartphones or tablets
Internet access
Pen and paper (optional)
Lesson Outline:
I. Introduction
Introduce the concept of mobile learning and its definition
Explain the benefits of mobile learning, including its flexibility and convenience, its ability to support just-in-time learning, and its potential to reach a wider audience
II. Examples of Mobile Learning
Provide examples of mobile learning, such as mobile apps, mobile-optimized websites, and SMS-based courses
Discuss the potential applications of mobile learning in various fields, such as education, training, and healthcare
III. Creating a Mobile Learning Lesson Plan
Provide guidelines for creating a mobile learning lesson plan, including identifying learning objectives, selecting content and delivery methods, and determining the duration of the lesson
Have students work in groups or individually to create a mobile learning lesson plan on a topic of their choice
Encourage students to think creatively and use different content and delivery methods to engage learners
IV. Reflection
Have students reflect on the process of creating a mobile learning lesson plan and share their experiences with the class
Encourage students to discuss the benefits and challenges of using mobile learning as a teaching and learning tool
V. Conclusion
Review the main points of the lesson, including the definition and benefits of mobile learning, and the steps for creating a mobile learning lesson plan
Encourage students to continue exploring mobile learning and consider its potential applications in their own fields of study or work.

Grade criteria, mark scheme, rubric to grade something and autograding

Q: Create a rubric to grade an article on instructional design basics

A: Instructional Design Basics Article Grading Rubric

Criteria

Excellent (4)

Good (3)

Satisfactory (2)

Needs Improvement (1)

Accuracy

The article accurately and comprehensively covers the basics of instructional design

The article covers the basics of instructional design accurately and mostly comprehensively

The article covers the basics of instructional design accurately, but not comprehensively

The article does not accurately cover the basics of instructional design

Clarity

The article is written in a clear and concise manner, making it easy to understand

The article is written clearly and concisely, but could be improved in some areas

The article is written clearly, but could be more concise

The article is not written clearly and is difficult to understand

Organization

The article is well-organized and presents information in a logical and coherent manner

The article is organized and presents information in a mostly logical and coherent manner

The article is organized, but the presentation of information could be more logical and coherent

The article is not well-organized and the presentation of information is confusing

Overall

The article is an excellent resource on the basics of instructional design

The article is a good resource on the basics of instructional design

The article is a satisfactory resource on the basics of instructional design

The article is not a useful resource on the basics of instructional desig

Q: Grade the following article using this rubric: Instructional design is the systematic process of creating educational or training materials and experiences in a structured and effective manner. It involves analyzing the learning needs of the audience, determining the most appropriate methods of instruction, and evaluating the effectiveness of the materials and methods used. Instructional design can be applied to a variety of settings, including classrooms, online courses, and corporate training programs. The goal of instructional design is to create materials that are engaging, effective, and efficient in helping learners acquire new knowledge and skills. There are several models and frameworks for instructional design, including the ADDIE model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) and the SAM model (Successive Approximation Model). These models provide a structured approach to designing and developing educational materials, starting with the identification of the learning needs and ending with the evaluation of the materials and their impact on learning. Instructional designers may use a variety of methods and tools to create materials, including lectures, videos, games, simulations, and interactive activities. They may also use technology, such as learning management systems and e-learning platforms, to deliver materials and track progress. Overall, instructional design is a crucial field that helps to ensure that learners receive the most effective and efficient education and training possible.

A: Using the provided grading rubric, I would give this article a grade of "Excellent" (4). The article accurately and comprehensively covers the basics of instructional design, and is written in a clear and concise manner that is easy to understand. It is also well-organized and presents the information in a logical and coherent manner. Overall, the article is an excellent resource on the basics of instructional design.

Identify correct answers

I tested several open online courses and about 90% of the answers were identified correctly. This, in my mind, draws the main "threat" because many online courses will now have weak final assessments and "certificate collectors" will have an opportunity to use this loophole.

Q: Select the correct answers here with relation to procrastination. One of the easiest ways to focus on product is to use the diffuse mode By focusing on product rather than process, you allow yourself to back away from judging yourself (Am I getting closer to finishing? ) and allow yourself to relax into the flow of the work. One of the easiest ways to focus on process is to focus on doing a Pomodoro—a twenty-five-minute timed work session. (Do NOT focus on completing a task.) It is best to try to focus on process, not product, because the product is often what triggers the pain that causes you to procrastinate.

A: One of the easiest ways to focus on process is to focus on doing a Pomodoro—a twenty-five-minute timed work session. (Do NOT focus on completing a task.)

It is best to try to focus on process, not product, because the product is often what triggers the pain that causes you to procrastinate.

Building skill sets

Q: Create a skill set for a new manager

A: Leadership: The ability to inspire and guide a team towards a common goal.
Communication: Strong verbal and written communication skills, including the ability to effectively convey ideas and delegate tasks.
Time management: The ability to prioritize tasks and manage time effectively to meet deadlines.
Problem solving: The ability to identify and analyze problems, generate solutions, and make informed decisions.
Interpersonal skills: The ability to effectively manage relationships with team members, clients, and other stakeholders.
Adaptability: The ability to adapt to changing circumstances and environments.
Strategic thinking: The ability to think long-term and develop plans to achieve organizational goals.
Conflict resolution: The ability to resolve conflicts and handle difficult situations in a professional manner.
Collaboration: The ability to work well in a team and foster a positive team dynamic.
Emotional intelligence: The ability to recognize and manage one's own emotions and the emotions of others.

More interesting prompts for various fields are now being collected by many enthusiasts online.  Concerning educational experiments with ChatGPT I believe deeper experiments need to be conducted in separate subjects like (math, language learning, literature), educational fields (like corporate learning), and in instructional design (personalized learning, microlearning and such).

Conclusions

  • More detailed prompts and examples in inputs of what you are expecting as a result significantly improve replies

  • AI will help educators save a lot of time on routine tasks like composing different tests and autograding for self-assessment tasks. This extra time could definitely be used by any educator for the better.

  • People will still choose an educational course based on the reliability and personal brand of the instructor, so even if some parts of the course are created using AI and verified by the educator, that would be either unnoticeable or beneficial to the students.

  • Businesses will definitely be the main beneficiaries of the new speed of educational content production. As someone who has worked in retail for a long time, I can clearly see many applications that will give solid results for employee upskilling.

  • Educators who learn the new skill of applying AI to their work will become more valuable and therefore highly paid in the job market.

  • Massive online courses that only have tests as the final control point should probably consider changing it.

  • Online courses that have a better control system will have higher value in the educational market than those with a more complex knowledge control system.

  • Proctoring and anti-plagiarism systems need to keep evolving.

  • For online exams, we need to continue proctoring applications if the final exam consists of a test, but we might also want to reconsider the final test concept overall and opt for final projects and actual skill demonstration tasks.

  • Personalized education will probably finally be possible for a wide range of educational cases, including corporate mass position education. We will be able to differentiate examples by personal interests and by the level of proficiency.

Brace yourselves as version 4 of GPT is coming sometime this year and it is expected to be even more efficient than what we have already seen. So, what choices do we have? I truly live by the saying if you can’t beat them lead them or if you can’t beat your enemy make him your ally. It didn’t take too long to build an app that can clearly identify texts written by AI and it is obvious that the discussion is now evolving more into practical advice on how we can embrace the new technology to make the educational process better from a scientific point of view.

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