• List your startup for free: a guide to Startup Digest

      Techstars Startup Digest was designed as a discovery tool for entrepreneurs looking for tech events in their area. It was founded in 2009 by Chris McCann who just moved to the Valley. He created an old-school newsletter, featuring promising events in the Bay Area. There was no website, all the events were hand-picked by Chris himself, and the newsletter had 22 subscribers. People liked the idea and that number quickly grew. In 2012 it was acquired by Startup Weekend. Three years later, Startup Weekend’s parent company UP Global was acquired by Techstars — and that’s how the project got its name.

      Startup Digest can be a useful tool for startups and event coordinators. If you can successfully leverage it, your event, blog post and/or tech product can reach thousands of people at no cost.

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    • Реальная история разработки Commodore C128

      • Translation

      Самый популярным компьютером, который когда-либо продавался, был Commodore C64, проданный в количестве 27 миллионов штук в 1980-е. Мало что осталось от тех времён, 8-битной ретро-эпохе, когда молодой длинноволосый инженер-самоучка, мог, имея решимость и удачу, сесть и разработать компьютер, используя механический карандаш, кучу справочников и много бумаги.

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    • Top 7 Technology Trends to Look out for in 2021

      Technology is as adaptable and compatible as mankind; it finds its way through problems and situations. 2020 was one such package of uncertain events that forced businesses to adapt to digital transformation, even to an extent where many companies started to consider the remote work culture to be a beneficiary long-term model. Technological advancements like Hyper automation, AI Security, and Distributed cloud showed how any people-centric idea could rule the digital era. The past year clearly showed the boundless possibilities through which technology can survive or reinvent itself. With all those learnings let's deep-dive and focus on some of the top technology trends to watch out for in 2021.

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    • Koyaanisqatsi: The WYSIWYG-style byte-code CPU

        Draft diagram of core

        SVG-File (actual draft)

        Lyrics


        Ancient times are known to everyone not with immortal works from Homer's only, but also with the Pythagorean multiplication table, Euclidean geometry and the Archimedes screw and the Pi, which we learned to use only relatively recently. In antiquity the art was not only to be able to write poetry and prose, but to design catapults or battering tools also, now there are rigid frameworks, when the discovering the new another beautiful formula is a formal words play only.
        Mathematics rules the modern world completely, cynically intertwining with the world of art, intruding with calculations in all spheres of our recreation and everyday life, when the colors of masterpieces turning into poisonous colours.
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      • A bit about our currently nameless game company, and what we’re working on at the moment

          Hey everyone! I represent a game studio without a name, and the project we’re working on goes by the technical name of "CGDrone". I started writing this article earlier today, having tortured myself for ages with sketches, colours, algorithms and correcting bugs in rotations based on quaternions (the last one just about finished me off). You can probably understand I needed a break.

          I’ve often come across stories people have posted online about how they made their game, the difficulties they faced, and the result they achieved at the end. Likewise, our team has its own story, and I’d like to share a bit about it.

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        • 10+ Biggest Remote Tech Jobs Aggregators Comparison

            There is a myriad of articles about where to find remote jobs, particularly in tech. Some of them are outdated and most of them don't provide detailed reviews. So that's why I decided to do my own research. I did a basic search by "React" skill (where possible) and expected to see mostly "Frontend Developer" vacancies.

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          • Ads
            AdBlock has stolen the banner, but banners are not teeth — they will be back

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          • How I create browser applications inside browsers

            • Translation

            GitJS


            In 2013 Canonical tried to crowdfund Ubuntu Edge smartphone. Its main feature could be the ability to use the smartphone as a full-fledged PС. Unfortunatly, the crowdfunding campaign did not accumulate enough money, so a dream of having a universal device remained to be the dream.


            I've been searching for universality, too, on the software side, not the hardware one. Today I can confidently say I found the necessary combination: Git and JavaScript.


            As you know, I have already described the benefits of browser applications (nCKOB static site generator) and the benefits of using Git instead of yet another back-end with API (GitBudget to track personal spendings). Once GitBudget was out, I spent the remaining 2020 to build a system allowing one to create browser applications right inside browsers. GitJS is the name of that system.

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          • The founder’s guide to AngelList

              AngelList is a social network designed to connect startups with investors and vice versa. The founders of it were dissatisfied with how opaque the VC world was, and found a way to increase the amount of available data. The project began in partnership with just 50 volunteer investors wishing to allocate $80 million in capital, and has grown to be the leading website of its kind. Over the past three years more than 75% of startups that received seed funding from American investors used AngelList to make it happen.

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            • Architectural approaches to authorization in server applications: Activity-Based Access Control Framework

              • Translation

              This article is about security. I’ll focus on this in the context of web applications, but I’ll also touch on other types of applications. Before I describe approaches and frameworks, I want to tell you a story.


              Background


              Throughout my years working in the IT sphere, I’ve had the opportunity to work on projects in a variety of fields. Even though the process of authenticating requirements remained relatively consistent, methods of implementing the authorization mechanism tended to be quite different from project to project. Authorization had to be written practically from scratch for the specific goals of each project; we had to develop an architectural solution, then modify it with changing requirements, test it, etc. All this was considered a common process that developers could not avoid. Every time someone implemented a new architectural approach, we felt more and more that we should come up with a general approach that would cover the main authorization tasks and (most importantly) could be reused on other applications. This article takes a look at a generalized architectural approach to authorization based on an example of a developed framework.


              Approaches to Creating a Framework


              As usual, before developing something new, we need to decide what problems we’re trying to solve, how the framework will help us solve them, and whether or not there is already a solution to these issues. I’ll walk you through each step, starting with identifying issues and describing our desired solution.


              We’re focusing on two styles of coding: imperative and declarative. Imperative style is about how to get a result; declarative is about what you want to get as a result.

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            • Doing «Data Science» even if you have never heard the words before

                There’s a lot of talk about machine learning nowadays. A big topic – but, for a lot of people, covered by this terrible layer of mystery. Like black magic – the chosen ones’ art, above the mere mortal for sure. One keeps hearing the words “numpy”, “pandas”, “scikit-learn” - and looking each up produces an equivalent of a three-tome work in documentation.

                I’d like to shatter some of this mystery today. Let’s do some machine learning, find some patterns in our data – perhaps even make some predictions. With good old Python only – no 2-gigabyte library, and no arcane knowledge needed beforehand.

                Interested? Come join us.

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              • Top 10 Best Voice Chat APIs for Mobile and Web Apps

                  Voice calling plays a crucial role in personal and professional communication. Be it a friendly conversation among classmates or a business deal between companies – voice calling has been the most easy, convenient, and affordable way to communicate for decades. Thus, communication corporations and developers have brought in innovative ways to integrate their Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and invent newer ways of voice communication.

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                • Modern Portable Voice Activity Detector Released

                    image


                    Currently, there are hardly any high quality / modern / free / public voice activity detectors except for WebRTC Voice Activity Detector (link). WebRTC though starts to show its age and it suffers from many false positives.


                    Also in some cases it is crucial to be able to anonymize large-scale spoken corpora (i.e. remove personal data). Typically personal data is considered to be private / sensitive if it contains (i) a name (ii) some private ID. Name recognition is a highly subjective matter and it depends on locale and business case, but Voice Activity and Number Detection are quite general tasks.


                    Key features:


                    • Modern, portable;
                    • Low memory footprint;
                    • Superior metrics to WebRTC;
                    • Trained on huge spoken corpora and noise / sound libraries;
                    • Slower than WebRTC, but fast enough for IOT / edge / mobile applications;
                    • Unlike WebRTC (which mostly tells silence from voice), our VAD can tell voice from noise / music / silence;
                    • PyTorch (JIT) and ONNX checkpoints;

                    Typical use cases:


                    • Spoken corpora anonymization;
                    • Can be used together with WebRTC;
                    • Voice activity detection for IOT / edge / mobile use cases;
                    • Data cleaning and preparation, number and voice detection in general;
                    • PyTorch and ONNX can be used with a wide variety of deployment options and backends in mind;
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                  • 10(+) years in the Labs

                      At the beginning of the year 2021, Qrator Labs is celebrating its 10 year anniversary. On January 19 our company marks the official passing of a formal 10 years longevity mark, entering its second decade of existence. 

                      Everything started a little bit earlier - when at the age of 10 Alex saw the Robotron K 1820 - in 2008, when Alexander Lyamin - the founder and CEO of Qrator Labs, approached the Moscow State University superiors, where he worked as a NOC engineer at the time, with an idea of a DDoS-attack mitigation research project. The MSU's network was one of the largest in the country and, as we know now, it was the best place to hatch a future technology.

                      That time MSU administration agreed, and Mr Lyamin took his own hardware to the university, simultaneously gathering a team. In two years, by summer 2010, the project turned out to be that successful. It courted the DDoS attack of a bandwidth exceeding the MSU's upstream bandwidth capability. And on June 22 MSU superiors gave Mr Lyamin a choice - to shut down or find money to incorporate.

                      Alexander Lyamin chose to incorporate with his own means, which effectively meant that the needed infrastructure must be built from scratch. The initial design should be distributed instead of concentrated within one network, which resources were not enough for this specific task. And by September 1, 2010, those first server sites were ready and running.

                      Flashback with us
                    • Passcode Data Protection by Using FPGA and Verilog

                        There are many situations when you need to protect your data, and different tools can be used to do that. For example, a safe. We develop a passcode data protection mechanism by using an FPGA board and Quartus Prime software. It allows demonstrating the basic concepts of a combination lock such as entering data, setting and checking a passcode, and displaying data.

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                      • Robotic Floor Washer

                        • Tutorial

                        When we think about robots, the first thing that comes to mind are robotic vacuum cleaners. The reason is simple: they are the most "solid" demonstration of success of "consumer" robotics. So making one sounds like a good idea... at first.

                        But isn't it a bit counter productive - to build something that popular, something we can buy in a store at a commodity (small) price? Should we build something similar, but NOT a vacuum cleaner? Something like... a floor washer, perhaps? Yes, a robotic floor washer.

                        In this tutorial I am going to build a fully working prototype of a robotic floor washer. By "fully working" I mean that it is going to wash floor, instead of moving dirt around like most robotic "moppers" do. While by "prototype" I mean it is going to be the first step towards production-ready unit, but not a production-ready unit yet. Let me explain.

                        First of all, it is not going to be THAT solid. You can grab a robotic vacuum cleaner that you got from the store by any part, including wheels and bumper and lift it. It will not fall apart. Ours probably will. The reason is, to make a device "mechanically solid" is a separate task, and if we focus on it, then "robotic" tasks will become more difficult to achieve. So we are going to do what engineers usually do: first they build C3PO without the outside body, wires everywhere and so on. And only then they put a gold-covered outfit on it.

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                      • 9 Reasons Why Students Don’t Want You as a Teacher

                          Teaching is hard! Finding a way to explain ideas and concepts, finding an approach to each individual among your students, each having a unique mind and learning capabilities. Being patient and creative, friendly but respective, kind but fair. You have to understand complex stuff and be able to present them in the simplest of ways. There are so many things that you must balance and consider in your work. Teachers, you are heroes, the every-day heroes! With this heroic work comes a responsibility. A responsibility of keeping yourself accountable for your student’s education. Some teachers forget about that and stay oblivious to the mistakes they are making. We’ve compiled a list of 9 Reasons Why Students Don’t Want You as a Teacher. We sincerely hope that it will help you to self-reflect, better connect with your students and achieve better results during your lessons.
                        • Playing with Nvidia's New Ampere GPUs and Trying MIG


                            Every time when the essential question arises, whether to upgrade the cards in the server room or not, I look through similar articles and watch such videos.


                            Channel with the aforementioned video is very underestimated, but the author does not deal with ML. In general, when analyzing comparisons of accelerators for ML, several things usually catch your eye:


                            • The authors usually take into account only the "adequacy" for the market of new cards in the United States;
                            • The ratings are far from the people and are made on very standard networks (which is probably good overall) without details;
                            • The popular mantra to train more and more gigantic models makes its own adjustments to the comparison;

                            The answer to the question "which card is better?" is not rocket science: Cards of the 20* series didn't get much popularity, while the 1080 Ti from Avito (Russian craigslist) still are very attractive (and, oddly enough, don't get cheaper, probably for this reason).


                            All this is fine and dandy and the standard benchmarks are unlikely to lie too much, but recently I learned about the existence of Multi-Instance-GPU technology for A100 video cards and native support for TF32 for Ampere devices and I got the idea to share my experience of the real testing cards on the Ampere architecture (3090 and A100). In this short note, I will try to answer the questions:


                            • Is the upgrade to Ampere worth it? (spoiler for the impatient — yes);
                            • Are the A100 worth the money (spoiler — in general — no);
                            • Are there any cases when the A100 is still interesting (spoiler — yes);
                            • Is MIG technology useful (spoiler — yes, but for inference and for very specific cases for training);
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                          • Russian AI Cup 2020 — a new strategy game for developers



                              This year, many processes transformed, with traditions and habits being modified. The rhythm of life has changed, and there's more uncertainty and strain. But IT person's soul wants diversity, and many developers have asked us if annual Russian AI Cup will be held this year. Is there going to be an announcement? What is the main theme of the upcoming championship? Should I take a vacation?

                              Though some changes are expected, it will be held in keeping with the best traditions. In the run-up, we will announce one of today's largest online AI programming championships — Russian AI Cup. We invite you to make history!
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                            • Active Termination Drivers

                              • Tutorial


                              The easiest way to build a driver with specified output impedance is to use an amplifier with high load compatibility and add a resistor to its output. The penalty is voltage drop across this resistor, so there is power loss and we need a higher supply voltage. If our driver is able to deliver the same voltage and current to the same load, but the extra resistor will have a lower value, our device will be able to deliver the same output power at a lower supply voltage. Less power losses, less heat, and longer working time when a battery is used.
                              There is an idea how to solve this problem: active termination. We can synthesize the output impedance!

                              Now when we know what we want, go to design our drivers!
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