• Introducing the .NET Community Standup Series

      We love our .NET community that is filled with amazing developers writing fantastic blogs, libraries, presentations, and pull requests every week. We are always looking for ways to highlight this amazing work, and for over 4 years the ASP.NET team here at Microsoft has been hosting their ASP.NET Community Standups live on YouTube and now Twitch.

      During the stream, they show off the latest and greatest community contributions along with all of the great open source work that the teams have been doing. As the .NET community expands so should the community standups, which is why we are pleased to introduce the expansion of their community standups that we officially call the “.NET Community Standup” series. These community standups span multiple teams and products in the world of .NET and show off the amazing work the community is doing.


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    • Searching for errors in the Amazon Web Services SDK source code for .NET

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        Welcome to all fans of trashing someone else's code. :) Today in our laboratory, we have a new material for a research — the source code of the AWS SDK for .NET project. At the time, we wrote an article about checking AWS SDK for C++. Then there was not anything particularly interesting. Let's see what .NET of the AWS SDK version is worth. Once again, it is a great opportunity to demonstrate the abilities of the PVS-Studio analyzer and make the world a bit better.
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      • The VS Code Roadmap 2019 — DRAFT

          As 2018 has come to an end, now is the time to look towards the future. We typically look out 6 to 12 months and establish topics we want to work on.


          As we go we learn and our assessment of some of the topics listed changes. Thus, we may add or drop topics as we go.


          We describe some initiatives as «investigations» which means our goal in the next few months is to better understand the problem and potential solutions before scheduling actual feature work. Once an investigation is done, we will update our plan, either deferring the initiative or committing to it.


          As always, we will listen to your feedback and adapt our plans if needed.


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        • .NET, TensorFlow, and the windmills of Kaggle — the journey begins

          This is a series of articles about my ongoing journey into the dark forest of Kaggle competitions as a .NET developer.

          I will be focusing on (almost) pure neural networks in this and the following articles. It means, that most of the boring parts of the dataset preparation, like filling out missing values, feature selection, outliers analysis, etc. will be intentionally skipped.

          The tech stack will be C# + TensorFlow tf.keras API. As of today it will also require Windows. Larger models in the future articles may need a suitable GPU for their training time to remain sane.
          Let's predict real estate prices!
        • Why anyone would bother to learn out-of-demand languages. A case study of the F# community

          • Translation


          We all hear of iconic movies, games, books or musical compositions that get vehemently praised by the community of sophisticados, professionals and critics, yet never seem to attract tangible commercial success or the attention of the wider audience. Such situations leave me deeply frustrated.

          When it comes to development, good tech also sometimes never gets into the limelight. Take F# for example. All I know about it is that it is a super-cool, yet totally unpopular language which makes it hard for developers – upon getting to know it – to get back to the languages they’re used to.

          I tried to find out what is the story behind this. In fact, who are the people who use it and why are they doing this if the language is out of demand in business? To find answers, I joined the Russian-speaking F# community on Telegram – our round table for the discussion.
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