• How to quickly prepare for a job interview with questions on algorithms and technologies

      Greetings to all readers of Habr! My name is Yuriy, I have been teaching high technologies, Oracle, Microsoft and others for more than 20 years, as well as creating, developing and supporting loaded information systems for various business customers. Today I would like to tell you about the current direction: interviews on data processing technologies. The Russian variant of this post you can find here.

      It doesn't really make sense for an employer to ask the applicant about traditional programming technologies. That is why I'm going to tell you how to prepare for an interview in only one narrow area related to information processing languages, namely, the processing of long integers(long arithmetic) and the identification of information properties of real world objects, which are described in long integers.
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    • Ternary computing: basics

        Balanced ternary


        I am working on a computer architecture principles lectures for our university; and as an assignment I'd like to propose to my students to build a simple programmable machine working in ternary. The main reason is fun: as a lecturer I must bring a bit of entertainment, otherwise I won't be listened to. Besides, it is important for historic reasons. Any further «why?!» questions will be answered «Because I can».

        This page describes the very basics, it won't go beyond a simple ternary adder (and its hardware implementation). Stay tuned for more.

        I chose the balanced ternary system: every trit represents one of three possible states, -1, 0 or 1. A very extensive description of this system may be found here.


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      • Naïve Math: the Mendocino motor and Earnshaw's theorem

        • Tutorial

        The problem statement


        I was surfing the Internet the other day and a rather curious thing caught my mind: the Mendocino motor. It’s an extremely low-friction bearing rotor: the original one had a glass cylinder hanging on two needles, but the modern ones use magnetic suspension. It’s a brushless engine: the rotor has solar batteries attached to it, which generate current for the coils wrapped around the rotor. The rotor spins in a fixed magnetic field, the solar batteries getting exposed to the light source one after the other. It’s a rather elegant solution that’s very possible to recreate at home.

        Here’s the video that explains how it works (in Russian):


        But this video had another curiosity even stronger than the engine itself. In the video description Dmitry Korzhevsky writes: “You CAN’T replace the side support with a magnet! Don’t ask me about this anymore!”
        I LOVE the 'impossible' word!