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Use-Case Evolution Guide

Level of difficultyMedium
Reading time13 min
Views606

Modern product development demands more and more sophisticated designs. This in turn leads to the increased complexity of both demand and implementation. Business is flooding the architecture and development teams with the new and changed requirements. Development teams are struggling to understand what the business demand is and find the best product increment strategy. One of the widely adopted conversational methods is the Use-Cases. This guide is intended to shed light on the process of the requirements development and maturing.

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Total votes 5: ↑5 and ↓0+5
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Productivity in Silence: The Ideal of Eliminating Meetings

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time10 min
Views627

In the software development industry, a lot of time and resources are spent on meetings. Many managers have calendars filled with meetings most of the time.

According to a study by Atlassian, the average worker spends up to 31 hours a month on unproductive meetings. That's about 8 hours a week, which is equivalent to a full work week for one employee out of a team of five people every month. If we convert this into working days, it means that on average four people are working, and one is constantly in meetings. This does not take into account additional time spent on informal discussions and ad-hoc meetings, which further reduce the time available for direct work on product creation. Thus, developers actually spend less than half of their working day on direct development, which is a worrying sign for any organization striving for innovation and efficiency.

Personally, I don't like meetings. I always try to minimize communication if an issue can be resolved without a face-to-face meeting. I apply this rule both at work and in life. For example, I prefer to refuel my car using an app, and I try to order food and other services without needing confirmation from an operator, and I did this even when such an approach was not so common. If I need to find a place, I will open a map in the app, instead of asking passers-by for directions.

My reluctance to waste time or be inefficient has resulted in our software development department carefully monitoring the time our developers spend on meetings. On average, a developer has only 2 hours and 15 minutes of mandatory meetings per week, including four 15-minute stand-ups, a 30-minute one-on-one meeting with a manager every two weeks, and 60 minutes for various meetings such as planning and demonstrations. The rest of the time, about 5 hours and 45 minutes, is spent on other activities in MS Teams, including chats and individual calls. Although we believe that this time should also be optimized, we focus mainly on key meetings to ensure that every minute spent is valuable.

In this article, I will consider the approaches I use and the ideas that motivate me to minimize the costs associated with meetings.

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Total votes 8: ↑8 and ↓0+8
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Giving and receiving feedback as a UX Designer: a short guide on how it should be done

Level of difficultyMedium
Reading time5 min
Views205

Getting feedback on the design of a digital product from the other members of the development team, stakeholders and clients is an essential part of a UX designer’s job. Ideally, it provides constructive criticism of the design, helps improve the product and perfect it as much as possible to present the best result of work to the users. But getting feedback doesn’t always happen smoothly – when communication is not established properly or the goals of the process are defined incorrectly, things can go the wrong way. In fact, both asking for feedback and giving it requires following some unwritten rules in order to make this experience useful and comfortable for all parties. In this article we’d like to discuss two things: how to ask for feedback correctly and what to consider if you’re the one who’s giving it.

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ABBYY: Mobile Technologies – Retrospectives

Reading time3 min
Views425

- Continuous Improvement is also a Project, a meta-Project, a maintenance that usually lasts longer than the main development project.

- If you can fit into the Sprint boundaries with your development cycle, then the concept of Retrospective as it is formulated in SCRUM may also suit you. But if you are bigger and not oriented on CI/CD, then be ready to make a hybrid of SCRUM with classical Project Management – thanks God SCRUM is good embeddable (proven by SAFe) !

- What is left out in when we run retrospectives quarterly? – Plan and Check. The placeholder of classical SCRUM Retrospective is quite suitable for that purpose, surrounded, of course, by some additional groomings, providing required action plans and decompositions up to sprint-length steps.

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Total votes 1: ↑1 and ↓0+1
Comments1

Business Continuity and Operation Resilience on paper vs. for real

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time7 min
Views563

Hello, my reading friends!

My previous post (rus) on Habr was about how the Business Continuity Management function started, as well as about its relations with other corporate functions. In fact, it was quite theoretical.

This time, I’d like to tell you about some practical vectors of procedures and tools implementation as regards to Business Continuity Management, or BCM, along with Operational Resilience, or OpRes. Plus some real initiatives that can follow the BCM & OpRes implementation in a company and the associated with it investigation of the corporate landscape and procedures.

More about initiatives for integration
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BCM & Operational resilience: yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Where has it come from and what comes next?

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time11 min
Views587

Recently, The BCI, one of the leading institutes working in the field of organizational resilience and business continuity, issued its regular report BCI Operational Resilience Report 2023 in collaboration with Riskonnect, who work with risk management solutions.

One of the questions they asked the respondents was if there was a difference between organizational resilience and operational resilience. As the answers demonstrated, for most respondents (and in most companies) these terms were used as synonyms. Having studied the report, the colleagues brought up another matter – The BCI introduced the new term of "organizational resilience" in addition to "business continuity" and "operational resilience".

If we search Habr for "Business Continuity", "DRP", "BCP", or "BIA", we’ll find quite enough posts by my colleagues (I’ve met some of them face to face and worked with the others) about data system recovery, data system testing, fault-tolerant infrastructure, and some other things. Yet, hardly any of them explain where all of it has come from, how it is changing, where it is heading – and why.

I thought the time has come to change the situation for the better and answer some of the questions like where business continuity provisions and operational resilience has come from, how they are changing, and where this trend is heading and why. To share my thoughts about development of the industry and its current de-facto state in case of a mature (or not too mature) introduction level – some things I’ve stated for my own use.

Intersections BCM & corporate functions
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Business Process Management Part 2. How to

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time12 min
Views10K

This article is written in a how-to style. It is based on my personal experience and opinions, so it may omit some steps that are common in BPM practice but that I have not encountered in my work. The topic is broad, and each section deserves a separate article. Therefore, if you are interested in a specific topic, please comment, and I will prepare a more detailed description.

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Total votes 3: ↑2 and ↓1+1
Comments3

How to Create Effective Product Funnels with Event Tracking

Level of difficultyMedium
Reading time8 min
Views1.1K

Regardless of how mature the product is, its owner will always be curious about how it performs, what the conversion rates are, and what areas for improvement there are. One of the most important tools that product owners should get access to at some point in time is an event tracking system.

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Setting Up an Experiment Environment for Data-Driven Product Development

Level of difficultyMedium
Reading time8 min
Views948

As a product owner, it is common to face the question of whether to proceed with option A or option B. Or, which version of the screen should be implemented to achieve better results? Making such decisions can be challenging, especially when you are under tight deadlines with limited resources. Furthermore, such decisions are made based on personal judgment or copying the approach of a competitor, which can lead to suboptimal results.

The good news is that one can avoid such pitfalls by setting up a simple experiment environment that requires relatively low effort. In this article, we will describe how you can achieve this.

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TRIZ: The Problem-Solving Methodology for Product Managers

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time11 min
Views2.2K

Background

As a product manager with over a decade of experience, I'm always looking for new ways to enhance my skills and help other product managers advance in their careers. One area that many companies focus on during the job interview process is analytical and creative problem-solving. And as product managers, we encounter these types of challenges on a daily basis. It's important to stay sharp and continuously develop our problem-solving abilities. That's why I made it a habit to practice a logic puzzle every day. But I also wondered if there was a common approach to solving these puzzles. That's when I discovered TRIZ – the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving. In this article, I'll provide an overview of what TRIZ is and how it can be applied in product management. Then, I'll apply TRIZ principles to solve a series of logical puzzles, showcasing the power and effectiveness of this methodology. So whether you're an experienced product manager looking to enhance your skills or someone who enjoys a good brain teaser, read on to discover the power of TRIZ!

If you find TRIZ to be a useful tool for problem-solving and innovation, there are many resources available to help you delve deeper into the methodology. The TRIZ Journal, for example, offers enough information on TRIZ, including case studies, articles, and other resources. You can also find books and online courses that provide a more in-depth look at TRIZ and how it can be applied in different industries and contexts. So if you're interested in learning more, there are plenty of opportunities to expand your knowledge and apply TRIZ to your work.

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Total votes 2: ↑2 and ↓0+2
Comments13

Business process management. Part 1. Why bother?

Level of difficultyEasy
Reading time4 min
Views8.6K

This is the first post in a series on Business Process Management (BPM). Having worked as a business analyst and product manager in various companies ranging from middle-sized startups to big corporations, I have observed differences in approaches to business process management - from almost complete disregard to excessive attention. So, I decided to share my views on the topic, why I think BPM is important, especially when a company grows fast and switches from the startup stage to a grown company, and what approach I think might work for a company of average size without involving too much time and resources.

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Total votes 3: ↑3 and ↓0+3
Comments0

IT risk management

Reading time13 min
Views2.2K

When you have an IT, which supports all aspects of your organization automated performance and you have a firm confidence that IT executes well, there is always a chance that something could go wrong in technology or in related IT processes. Depending on complexity of IT environment varieties of risks scenarios could arise. This article as a summary of different faithworthy sources aims to help you in getting high level understanding on what could go wrong and how you can predict it in a more conscious way.

My name is Maxim Tornov and I have been working in various IT areas for a long period of time. Since then, for over 14 years I am working in the area of IT/IS risk management with focus on in IT/IS audits, internal control implementation and assessment.

I am sure that at the present the topic of Information Technologies risk management became more vital. Organization’s efficiency in IT risk management directly affects the achievement of various organization’s goals, goals which have dependency on IT, those goals may include reliability and efficiency of business processes, the organization's compliance with regulatory requirements, the integrity of financial reporting, and many others.

I sincerely hope that this material will be useful to you and may give you some new ideas that you can contribute to the benefit of your personal development and the development of your organization's risk management culture.

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Total votes 2: ↑2 and ↓0+2
Comments0

How to choose a static analysis tool

Reading time8 min
Views2.2K

Tools to improve and control code quality can be a key success factor in a complex software project implementation. Static analyzers belong to such tools. Nowadays, you can find various static analyzers: from free open-source to cross-functional commercial solutions. On the one hand, it's great – you can choose from many options. On the other hand – you have to perform advanced research to find the right tool for your team.

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Total votes 4: ↑2 and ↓20
Comments0

PVS-Studio team's kanban board. Part 2: YouTrack

Reading time28 min
Views1.2K

Hello everyone! Welcome to the second part of the PVS-Studio Team's Kanban Board story. This time we'll talk about YouTrack. You'll learn why we chose and implemented this task tracker and what challenges we encountered. We don't want to advertise or criticize YouTrack. Nevertheless, our team thinks JetBrains has done (and keeps doing) a great job.


0853_Kanban_YouTrack/image1.png

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Total votes 2: ↑1 and ↓1+2
Comments0

Content marketing stamina — the easy way for startup founders to get ahead of their competition

Reading time4 min
Views1.4K

Content marketing is an endless endurance race. You can’t put a cap on business growth, even if you’re a tech industry giant. A single success is not enough — every time you reach the finish line, it moves further away. Retaining your existing customers is no walk in the park either. When you go silent, you are actively ignoring your audience. There’s no way around it — you need to pump out content.

However, doing that day in and day out requires a lot of stamina. So let’s look at why we get tired in the first place, and figure out how to avoid it. [Previous article: The true cost of free labour].

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Total votes 3: ↑2 and ↓1+2
Comments1

Architecting Architecture

Reading time6 min
Views2.7K

Architect. This word sounds so mysterious. So mysterious that to understand it you are almost forced to add something. Like “System Architect” or “Program Architect”. Such an addition does not make it clearer, but for sure adds weight to the title. Now you know – that’s some serious guy! I prefer to make undoubtful and around 10 years ago added to my email signature “Enterprise Architect of Information Systems”. It’s a powerful perk. Like “Chosen One”. With architects it is always the matter of naming, you know. Maybe that is why the only way to become an architect is to be named as one by others. Like with vampires. One of them has to byte you! That is probably the easiest way to earn the title as there is no degree or school to grant you one. And if there’s a troubling title, somebody’s making a trouble, and the only reason for making a trouble that I know of is because you’re an Enterprise. Huge old and complex multinational corporation. Like a one-legged pirate. Strong and scary, but not a good runner. You own your ship, you had good days, you have some gold, you need new ways.

To get to new treasures and avoid losing the second leg to piranha regulators and local business sharks swarming waters near every enterprise ship – every pirate has a map. A map is a list of major features and requirements in desired order and priority.

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Total votes 2: ↑2 and ↓0+2
Comments1

Startups going global: a guide to Product Hunt

Reading time4 min
Views2.1K

Product Hunt is a Y-combinator backed discovery platform, founded by Ryan Hoover in 2013. Conceived as an email list, it has gone on to become one of the most popular directories, raised $7.5 million in backing and was acquired by AngelList — a social network for entrepreneurs — in December 2016.

Exposure on the platform contributed to viral successes of Yo and Ship Your Enemies Glitter, and brought multi-million dollar companies, like Robinhood and Gimlet Media, to the public eye.

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Total votes 5: ↑5 and ↓0+5
Comments0

How to prepare for PMP exam in 60 days

Reading time4 min
Views1.8K
Do you think of taking the PMP exam? Awesome! Do you know how to plan your preparation for the test? Here I’m going to share the plan of how to get prepared for the PMP exam in 60 days.

PMP exam = your own project


To begin with, let’s clarify: you’re ready to work hard and to follow the plan. Otherwise, this journey will take you forever. The key here is to perceive the PMP exam as your personal project and manage it like you're managing projects for your clients. The difference here is that you are your client yourself; and you are the resource to release this project. What is more, you will need not only to plan this project, but to execute the plan yourself too. On one hand, it will add an additional challenge. On the other hand, it will make things even more exciting to get them done.

What do you need to launch this project? First of all, the input data. This is actually what you usually need to start a project. I’m talking about the key performance indicators that we consider while planning a project. They are time, scope and budget. Of course, funds are important. As you have decided to take the test and to pass the certification you should be aware of the process: how much the test costs, how much the course costs, and other relevant expenses. Therefore, let’s move directly to the time and scope.

Time


You have 60 days in order to get prepared for the PMP exam, and that is why you need to define how much time you are able to allocate to get prepared for the tests daily.

Yes, daily, because 60 days is quite an intense period. I know that for some people it takes six months or even a year to get prepared for this test. However, the less period of time you have, the more advantages you finally get.

Here is the thing, for the PMP there is no shortcut. It is quite a big volume of knowledge that you need to obtain in order to pass this test.
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