• Web and Azure Tool Updates in Visual Studio 2019

      Hopefully by now you’ve seen that Visual Studio 2019 is now generally available. As you would expect, we’ve added improvements for web and Azure development. As a starting point, Visual Studio 2019 comes with a new experience for getting started with your code and we updated the experience for creating ASP.NET and ASP.NET Core projects to match:



      If you are publishing your application to Azure, you can now configure Azure App Service to use Azure Storage and Azure SQL Database instances, right from the publish profile summary page, without leaving Visual Studio. This means that for any existing web application running in App Service, you can add SQL and Storage, it is no longer limited to creation time only.

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    • Visual Studio 2019 .NET productivity

        Your friendly neighborhood .NET productivity team (aka. Roslyn) focuses a lot on improving the .NET coding experience. Sometimes it’s the little refactorings and code fixes that really improve your workflow. You may have seen many improvements in the previews, but for all of you who were eagerly awaiting the GA release here’s a few features you may enjoy!


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      • Live Share now included with Visual Studio 2019

          We’re excited to announce the general availability of Visual Studio Live Share, and that it is now included with Visual Studio 2019! In the year since Live Share began its public preview, we’ve been working to enhance the many ways you collaborate with your team. This release is the culmination of that work, and all the things we’ve learned from you along the way.


          If you haven’t heard of Live Share, it’s a tool that enables real-time collaborative development with your teammates from the comfort of your own tools. You’re able to share your code, and collaboratively edit and debug, without needing to clone repos or set up environments. It’s easy to get started with Live Share.


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        • Little great things about Visual Studio 2019

            A few days ago, we announced the general availability of Visual Studio 2019. But I’ve been using Visual Studio 2019 exclusively since the first internal build – long before the release of Preview 1 in December of 2018. During this time, there has been a lot of little features that have put a smile on my face and made me more productive.


            I want to share a few of them with you since they are not all obvious and some require you to change some settings. Let’s dive in.


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          • SIMD Extension to C++ OpenMP in Visual Studio

              In the era of ubiquitous AI applications there is an emerging demand of the compiler accelerating computation-intensive machine-learning code for existing hardware. Such code usually does mathematical computation like matrix transformation and manipulation and it is usually in the form of loops. The SIMD extension of OpenMP provides users an effortless way to speed up loops by explicitly leveraging the vector unit of modern processors. We are proud to start offering C/C++ OpenMP SIMD vectorization in Visual Studio 2019.


              The OpenMP C/C++ application program interface was originally designed to improve application performance by enabling code to be effectively executed in parallel on multiple processors in the 1990s. Over the years the OpenMP standard has been expanded to support additional concepts such as task-based parallelization, SIMD vectorization, and processor offloading. Since 2005, Visual Studio has supported the OpenMP 2.0 standard which focuses on multithreaded parallelization. As the world is moving into an AI era, we see a growing opportunity to improve code quality by expanding support of the OpenMP standard in Visual Studio. We continue our journey in Visual Studio 2019 by adding support for OpenMP SIMD.


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            • Checking the Roslyn Source Code

                PVS-Studio vs Roslyn

                Once in a while we go back to the projects that we have previously checked using PVS-Studio, which results in their descriptions in various articles. Two reasons make these comebacks exciting for us. Firstly, the opportunity to assess the progress of our analyzer. Secondly, monitoring the feedback of the project's authors to our article and the report of errors, which we usually provide them with. Of course, errors can be corrected without our participation. However, it is always nice when our efforts help to make a project better. Roslyn was no exception. The previous article about this project check dates back to December 23, 2015. It's quite a long time, in the view of the progress that our analyzer has made since that time. Since the C# core of the PVS-Studio analyzer is based on Roslyn, it gives us additional interest in this project. As a result, we're as keen as mustard about the code quality of this project. Now let's test it once again and find out some new and interesting issues (but let's hope that nothing significant) that PVS-Studio will be able to find.
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              • How the CSS markup fragment broke the C++ compiler

                  Picture 1

                  Static analysis methodology involves various technologies. One of them is preprocessing files right before analyzing them. Preprocessed files are created by the compiler that runs in a special working mode. Unfortunately, our long-standing experience of developing a static analyzer shows that this mode is not great for testing. In this note, I'll give the example of a fresh bug in the C++ compiler from Microsoft.
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                • Achieve more with Microsoft Game Stack

                    Microsoft Game Stack


                    Microsoft is built on the belief of empowering people and organizations to achieve more – it is the DNA of our company. We are announcing a new initiative, Microsoft Game Stack, in which we commit to bringing together Microsoft tools and services that will empower game developers like yourself, whether you’re an indie developer just starting out or a AAA studio, to achieve more.


                    This is the start of a new journey, and today we are only taking the first steps. We believe Microsoft is uniquely suited to deliver on that commitment. Our company has a long legacy in games – and in building developer-focused platforms.


                    There are 2 billion gamers in the world today, playing a broad range of games, on a broad range of devices. There is as much focus on video streaming, watching, and sharing within a community as there is on playing or competing. As game creators, you strive every day to continuously engage your players, to spark their imaginations, and inspire them, regardless of where they are, or what device they’re using. We’re introducing Microsoft Game Stack, to help you do exactly that.

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                  • Announcing TypeScript 3.4 RC

                      Some days ago we announced the availability of our release candidate (RC) of TypeScript 3.4. Our hope is to collect feedback and early issues to ensure our final release is simple to pick up and use right away.


                      To get started using the RC, you can get it through NuGet, or use npm with the following command:


                      npm install -g typescript@rc

                      You can also get editor support by



                      Let’s explore what’s new in 3.4!


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